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  • PM Prayut may have his way in Cabinet reshuffle, but bigger challenge lies ahead
    Despite being coerced into reshuffling his Cabinet by factions in the ruling Palang Pracharath Party, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has at least succeeded in resisting pressure from political veterans and...

    Despite being coerced into reshuffling his Cabinet by factions in the ruling Palang Pracharath Party, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has at least succeeded in resisting pressure from political veterans and stamping his authority on the ministerial selection.

    Observers, however, see his first Cabinet shake-up as only a temporary end to the tug-of-war within the core party of the coalition, but are divided as to when the government’s stability will be shaken again.

    Most of them agree that Prayut has an advantage, since the current junta-sponsored charter was designed to allow the post-coup regime to retain power after the March 2019 general elections. Without charter amendment, Prayut is unlikely to be easily ousted from office.

    “So far, the premier has been successful in halting the power struggle within the ruling party, but his government’s stability will be rocked again when the charter amendment process begins,” said Wanwichit Boonprong, a political scientist at Rangsit University.

    The reshuffle was seen as a bid to end disharmony in the ruling party triggered by the powerful Sam Mitr (Three Friends) faction, which had pressed Prayut for more than two months to hand it party executive seats and juicy Cabinet portfolios.

    The faction wanted its leader, incumbent Industry Minister Suriya Juangroongruangkit, to take over former party secretary-general Sontirat Sontijirawong’s energy portfolio and have the industry portfolio handed to Anucha Nakasai, the party’s new secretary-general.

    In the end, Anucha only became PM’s Office minister, while Suriya stayed put as industry minister.

    In contrast, secretaries-general of other coalition parties, such as Bhumjaithai’s Saksayam Chidchob and the Democrats’ Chalermchai Sri-on, are able to keep their “A” grade portfolios – the ministries of Transport and of Agriculture and Cooperatives, respectively.

    “The faction is certainly unhappy with the Cabinet shake-up, but they may have to be patient and wait for a while,” Wanwichit said.

    Regarding the warning from core Sam Mitr members of a reshuffle “aftershock”, Wanwichit said that as soon as the door for charter amendment opens, politicians will likely run wild again – even those who supported the junta’s extended stay in power.

    Calls for the drafting of a new charter are growing louder after anti-establishment protesters, mostly led by university students, returned to the streets last month.

    Observers said provisions in the charter – such as the one enabling the 250 junta-appointed senators to vote for a new PM along with the 500-member lower House, and a mixed-member proportional electoral system that makes every vote count for both candidate and party – helped the pro-junta Palang Pracharath Party form a coalition government despite coming second in the election. The party’s sole prime ministerial candidate, General Prayut, became premier again – with unanimous backing from the Senate.

    “Once charter amendment is unlocked, the power of senators will be reduced and the preferential electoral system will be changed, thus freeing the politicians [from the powers that be],” Wanwichit said.

    Yuthaporn Issarachai, a political scientist from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University, agreed that as long as Prayut has senators supporting him, he still has an advantage. Meanwhile charter change is a long, drawn out process and will not take place any time soon, he added.

    Prayut’s government may enjoy political stability for another three months but would then face an acid test from three key events, Yuthaporn said.

    First, three months from now, the public will be able to evaluate the abilities of the new ministers. Second, the final quarter will arrive and unemployment figures and company performances will be revealed to show exactly how bad the economy is doing. And third, the anti-government protests may grow much bigger.

     

    Unimpressive new faces

    In the long-waited announcement of the new Cabinet line-up last week, the post of finance minister went to Predee Daochai, former co-president of Kasikornbank (KBank) and chairman of the Thai Bankers’ Association; Anucha, secretary-general of the ruling Palang Pracharath Party, became PM’s Office minister; the new Higher Education, Science and Innovations minister is Anek Laothamatas, an executive of the Action Coalition for Thailand Party (ACT); Supattanapong Punmeechaow, the former director of PTT Global Chemical, is deputy PM and Energy chief; Foreign Minister Don Pramudwinai now doubles as deputy premier; and Palang Pracharath’s deputy leader, Suchart Chomklin, is the new labour minister with former government spokesperson Narumon Pinyosinwat as his deputy.

    Prayut managed to retain the economics-related portfolios of Finance and Energy under his prime minister’s quota, to the bitter disappointment of Sam Mitr faction which had targeted both posts. However, experts believe the new line-up is designed more to stabilise the ruling party than to benefit the national interest.

    Titipol Phakdeewanich, political science dean at Ubon Ratchathani University, said the reshuffle showed no attempt at political reform but was in fact a reward for those who supported the coup.

    He cited the appointment of Anek from ACT, a party that was founded by Suthep Thaugsuban, a former leader of the yellow-shirt People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC). Protests by the PDRC played a vital role in toppling Yingluck Shinawatra’s government, after her Pheu Thai Party proposed a blanket amnesty bill that would have exonerated her brother and former PM Thaksin, among others.

    “Choosing a person with conservative views to oversee higher education may impede progress in both education and democracy. This [Anek’s appointment] may be seen as a mechanism created by the government to control universities and student activism,” Titipol said.

    The Prayut government is facing student-led protests demanding Constitutional amendments and the dissolution of Parliament.

    Wanwichit said he had expected bigger changes to the Cabinet. He gave Prayut only six out of 10 for reshuffle, citing two reasons.

    First, he said, Prayut failed to demonstrate how new Finance Minister Predee and Energy Minister Supattanapong were an upgrade on their predecessors.

    “Both may be ‘somebody’ in their professional fields, but they are ‘nobody’ in the eyes of the public. So, if their expertise is not promoted [to the public], both could end up with zero political charisma [in the eyes of voters],” Wanwichit said.

    The reshuffle was sparked by last month’s mass resignation of the Cabinet economics team, a quartet of technocrats known as the “Four Boys” and their mentor. Finance minister Uttama Savanayana, energy minister Sontirat, minister of higher education, science, research and innovation Suvit Maesincee and Kobsak Pootrakool, deputy secretary-general to the PM for political affairs, led by then-deputy PM Somkid Jatusripitak, quit their posts after weeks of pressure from Palang Pracharath Party factions. The ministers had earlier been ousted from the party’s executive board.

    The reshuffle’s second major shortcoming, said Wanwichit, was the appointment of former government spokesperson Narumon as deputy labour minister “at the request of” Palang Pracharath Party leader and Deputy Prime Minister General Prawit Wongsuwan.

    Narumon, known to be a member of Prawit’s inner circle, had been criticised for her lacklustre performance as spokesperson.

    “This [Narumon’s appointment] risks stirring bad feeling within the party among those who think they are more capable than her,” Wanwichit said.

    By Thai PBS World’s Political Desk

    12 August 2020
    News
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252746
  • 105 university lecturers defend student’s dialogue on the Thai Monarchy
    105 lecturers, from various universities across Thailand, issued a statement today defending the controversial speeches, delivered during the protest at Thammasat University on Monday night, as honest and legitimate expressions...

    105 lecturers, from various universities across Thailand, issued a statement today defending the controversial speeches, delivered during the protest at Thammasat University on Monday night, as honest and legitimate expressions regarding the role in and relationship of the Thai Monarchy to Thai society.

    The lecturers cited Section 34 of the Constitution, which guarantees the freedom of expression through speech, writing, publications, advertisements and other means and that such expression cannot be restricted, except by virtue of special laws to protect national security, the rights and liberties of the people, public order, good morals or for the protection of public health.

    The lecturers said that this is the first time, for many years, that such views have been expressed in an open manner and that there is a proposal to amend the Constitution and related laws to retain the status of the Monarchy under a democratic system, with the King as head of the state.

    The controversial opinions, said the lecturers, are in line with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which Thailand is a signatory.

    They said none of the protesters’ ten proposals, regarding the Monarchy, contained any content which could be deemed as insulting or offending the highest institution.

    “In their capacity as institutes of knowledge, universities have an important role in promoting the search for ways for Thai society to progress and, for that matter, they should be an open space for free expression, especially on issues which are of public interest,” the statement added.

    “Condemning divergent views, as a transgression or improper, does not help Thai society advance intellectually. The whole dialogue will be reduced to just aggressive expression,” said the statement.

    Meanwhile, Lt-Gen Kongcheep Tantravanich, spokesman for the Defence Ministry, urged all members of the Thai public to warn student activists not to be used as a tool of political elements.

    Although the Thai military respects the students’ right to free expression, he said they are very concerned about the activists’ allegedly improper references to the Monarchy, particularly regarding the proposal relating to the role of the Monarchy.

    12 August 2020
    Highlight
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252747
  • Five new quarantined COVID-19 cases reported in Thailand on Wednesday
    Thailand has recorded five new COVID-19 cases today, all arrivals from abroad and in state quarantine. According to the CCSA, one is a 50-year old American citizen, of Thai descent,...

    Thailand has recorded five new COVID-19 cases today, all arrivals from abroad and in state quarantine.

    According to the CCSA, one is a 50-year old American citizen, of Thai descent, who arrived from the US on July 26th and entered quarantine in a hotel in Bangkok. He cleared the first test, but was confirmed to be infected in the second, on August 10th.

    The second case is an 18-year old Thai student, returning from India on July 30th on the same flight as a passenger who was earlier found to be infected. On August 3rd, he developed muscle pains, a headache, a runny nose and a fever. He tested positive for the virus on August 10th.

    The three other cases are Thai students, returning from Egypt on July 30th on the same flight as six passengers who had earlier tested positive for COVID-19. They entered state quarantine in Chon Buri province and tested positive on August 10th, although there were no symptoms.

    Cumulative infections in Thailand, to date, are 3,356, with 3,169 recoveries and 58 deaths.  129 others are still being treated in hospital.

    Thailand is ranked the world’s 113th, in terms of total infections. The US still leads the pack, with 5,305,957 infections and 167,749 deaths. Brazil comes second, with 3,112,393 infections and 103,099 deaths, India third, with 2,267,153 infections and 46,188 deaths, Russia fourth, with 892,654 infections and 15,131 deaths and South Africa in fifth place, with 563,588 cases and 10,751 deaths.

    12 August 2020
    Coronavirus Outbreak Update
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252740
  • Flooding predicted in central region, but Bangkok will be safe – Dr. Seri
    Thailand’s central region has a 70% chance of experiencing flooding over the next two months, with Ayutthaya province expected to be hardest hit because of its limited water retention area...

    Thailand’s central region has a 70% chance of experiencing flooding over the next two months, with Ayutthaya province expected to be hardest hit because of its limited water retention area in the Chao Phraya River basin, predicted Dr. Seri Suprathit, director of Rangsit University, Climate Change and Disaster Centre.

    During a TV talk show on Tuesday night, Dr. Seri forecast that Thailand will experience heavy rain until October, which will cause flooding in the central, eastern and southern regions, especially on the central plains, which will have a 70% chance of being inundated. Bangkok and neighbouring province of Pathum Thani, however, will be spared.

    He said that the floods this year will not be as bad as the catastrophic flooding of 2011, because excess water had been released through major dams in the North, worsening flooding from heavy rains in the central region.

    Most reservoirs in the North still have a lot of spare capacity to hold rainwater, because only 5 or 6 storms have hit Thailand, compared to an average of 20 each year, he explained.

    He also predicted that about 40% of the land mass in Bangkok will be under water in the next 30 years, due to the combination of rising sea levels, as a result of global warming, and land subsidence.

    He noted that, during high tides of an average of 1.5 metres, several areas in Samut Prakan province, such as Bangpu and Poochao Samingprai and certain sections of Sukhumvit Road get flooded. If the high tide is 2.5 metres, the sea water will destroy the environment and threaten the underground train system, if there is no mitigation system in place.

    12 August 2020
    General
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252741
  • Student union defiant as Monday’s protest raises concerns of political violence
    A defiant Thammasat University student union is maintaining that the views expressed during the protest rally at the university’s Rangsit campus on Monday night, including allegedly improper references to the...

    A defiant Thammasat University student union is maintaining that the views expressed during the protest rally at the university’s Rangsit campus on Monday night, including allegedly improper references to the Monarchy, are legitimate and in line with the Thai Constitution and international rules regarding political rights.

    In an undated statement, the union voiced sympathy for the university’s administrators and urged them not to bow to pressure for them to take responsibility for any alleged transgressions during the protest, and to stand firm on the principles of democracy and righteousness.

    The student union also vowed to stand by the student protesters.

    Critics of allegedly improper references made regarding the Monarchy have demanded that Dr. Prinya Thaewanarumitkul, the Vice Rector, and Rector Mrs. Kesinee Vitoonchart, take responsibility for the incident, more than just offering a public apology, with some urging them to file a police complaint against the protest organizers.

    It had been agreed by the organizers, the Khlong Luang district police and the university’s administrators, that the views, to be expressed by the protesters, must be limited to matters relating to the Constitution, the dissolution of Parliament and alleged harassment of protesters by Government officials.

    Meanwhile, it is reported that the protest, scheduled to take place today (Wednesday) by the Free People movement and its allies in the Lumpini Park, has been abruptly cancelled out of concerns for the safety of the protesters.

    Sources close to the protest group said that the organizers planned to livestream an address by Somsak Jeamteerasakul, a fugitive former Thammasat University lecturer who has been living in exile in France to escape lèse majesté charges in Thailand.

    Senator Kanoon Sitthisamarn has proposed a special parliamentary session to discuss the current political situation to prevent, what he fears, could become a repeat of the “October 6th” student massacre in 1976.

    He said that the demand of the protesters regarding the Monarchy, which was made public during the protest on Monday night, has never been expressed so openly in public in Thailand.

    He added that the student activists have crossed the line “away from normal political dialogue.”

    Dr. Rienthong Nanna, the pro-royalist director of Monkut Wattana Hospital, meanwhile, advised the parents of students that they should prevent them from attending the rallies, saying that the current political conflict has escalated to the point that violence could occur at any moment.

    12 August 2020
    News
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252737
  • Biden picks Kamala Harris as running mate, first Black woman
    WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden named California Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, making history by selecting the first Black woman to compete on a major...

    WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden named California Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, making history by selecting the first Black woman to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket and acknowledging the vital role Black voters will play in his bid to defeat President Donald Trump.

    In choosing Harris, Biden is embracing a former rival from the Democratic primary who is familiar with the unique rigor of a national campaign. The 55-year-old first-term senator, who is also of South Asian descent, is one of the party’s most prominent figures. She quickly became a top contender for the No. 2 spot after her own White House campaign ended.

    She will appear with Biden for the first time as his running mate at an event Wednesday near his home in Wilmington, Delaware.

    In announcing the pick, Biden called Harris a “fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants.” She said Biden would “unify the American people” and “build an America that lives up to our ideals.”

    Harris joins Biden at a moment of unprecedented national crisis. The coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 160,000 people in the U.S., far more than the toll experienced in other countries. Business closures and disruptions resulting from the pandemic have caused severe economic problems. Unrest, meanwhile, has emerged across the country as Americans protest racism and police brutality.

    Trump’s uneven handling of the crises has given Biden an opening, and he enters the fall campaign in strong position against the president. In adding Harris to the ticket, he can point to her relatively centrist record on issues such as health care and her background in law enforcement in the nation’s largest state.

    The president told reporters Tuesday he was “a little surprised” that Biden picked Harris, pointing to their debate stage disputes during the primary. Trump, who had donated to her previous campaigns, argued she was “about the most liberal person in the U.S. Senate.”

    “I would have thought that Biden would have tried to stay away from that a little bit,” he said.

    Harris’s record as California attorney general and district attorney in San Francisco was heavily scrutinized during the Democratic primary and turned away some liberals and younger Black voters who saw her as out of step on issues of racism in the legal system and police brutality. She declared herself a “progressive prosecutor” who backs law enforcement reforms.

    Biden, who spent eight years as President Barack Obama’s vice president, has spent months weighing who would fill that same role in his White House. He pledged in March to select a woman as his vice president, easing frustration among Democrats that the presidential race would center on two white men in their 70s.

    Biden’s search was expansive, including Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a leading progressive; Florida Rep. Val Demings, whose impeachment criticism of Trump won party plaudits; California Rep. Karen Bass, who leads the Congressional Black Caucus; former Obama national security adviser Susan Rice; and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, whose passionate response to unrest in her city garnered national attention.

    A woman has never served as president or vice president in the United States. Hillary Clinton was the Democratic presidential nominee in 2016. Two women have been nominated as running mates on major party tickets: Democrat Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 and Republican Sarah Palin in 2008. Their parties lost in the general election.

    The vice presidential pick carries increased significance this year. If elected, Biden would be 78 when inaugurated in January, the oldest man to ever assume the presidency. He’s spoken of himself as a transitional figure and hasn’t fully committed to seeking a second term in 2024.

    Harris, born in 1964 to a Jamaican father and Indian mother, spent much of her formative years in Berkeley, California. She has often spoken of the deep bond she shared with her mother, whom she has called her single biggest influence.

    Harris won her first election in 2003 when she became San Francisco’s district attorney. In that post, she created a reentry program for low-level drug offenders and cracked down on student truancy.

    She was elected California’s attorney general in 2010, the first woman and Black person to hold the job, and focused on issues including the foreclosure crisis. She declined to defend the state’s Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage and was later overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

    After being elected to the Senate in 2016, she quickly gained attention for her assertive questioning of Trump administration officials during congressional hearings.

    Harris launched her presidential campaign in early 2019 with the slogan “Kamala Harris For the People,” a reference to her courtroom work. She was one of the highest-profile contenders in a crowded Democratic primary and attracted 20,000 people to her first campaign rally in Oakland.

    But the early promise of her campaign eventually faded. Her law enforcement background prompted skepticism from some progressives, and she struggled to land on a consistent message that resonated with voters. Facing fundraising problems, she abruptly withdrew from the race in December 2019, two months before the first votes of the primary were cast.

    One standout moment of her presidential campaign came at the expense of Biden. During a debate, she said Biden made “very hurtful” comments about his past work with segregationist senators and slammed his opposition to busing as schools began to integrate in the 1970s.

    “There was a little girl in California who was a part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day,” she said. “And that little girl was me.”

    Shaken by the attack, Biden called her comments “a mischaracterization of my position.”

    The exchange resurfaced recently with a report that one of Biden’s closest friends and a co-chair of his vice presidential vetting committee, former Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd, still harbors concerns about the debate and that Harris hadn’t expressed regret. The comments attributed to Dodd and first reported by Politico drew condemnation, especially from influential Democratic women who said Harris was being held to a standard that wouldn’t apply to a man running for president.

    Some Biden confidants said Harris’ debate attack did irritate the former vice president, who had a friendly relationship with her. Harris was also close with Biden’s late son, Beau, who served as Delaware attorney general while she held the same post in California.

    But Biden and Harris have since returned to a warm relationship.

    “Joe has empathy, he has a proven track record of leadership and more than ever before we need a president of the United States who understands who the people are, sees them where they are, and has a genuine desire to help and knows how to fight to get us where we need to be,” Harris said at an event for Biden earlier this summer.

    At the same event, she bluntly assailed Trump, labeling him a “drug pusher” for his promotion of the unproven and much-questioned malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus. After Trump tweeted “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” in response to protests about the death of George Floyd, a Black man in police custody, Harris said his remarks “yet again show what racism looks like.”

    Harris has taken a tougher stand on policing since Floyd’s killing. She co-sponsored legislation in June that would ban police from using chokeholds and no-knock warrants, set a national use-of-force standard and create a national police misconduct registry, among other things. It would also reform the qualified immunity system that shields officers from liability.

    The list in the legislation included practices Harris did not vocally fight to reform while leading California’s Department of Justice. And while she now wants independent investigations of police shootings, she didn’t support a 2015 California bill that would have required her office to take on such cases.

    “We made progress, but clearly we are not at the place yet as a country where we need to be and California is no exception,” she told The Associated Press recently. The national focus on racial injustice now, she said, shows “there’s no reason that we have to continue to wait.”

    12 August 2020
    Highlight
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252734
  • Deputy Attorney-General in Red Bull Heir case quits
    Deputy Attorney-General Nate Narksook, who endorsed the public prosecutors’ decision not to prosecute Red Bull heir Vorayuth Yoovidhya on a charge of reckless driving causing death, has tendered his resignation....

    Deputy Attorney-General Nate Narksook, who endorsed the public prosecutors’ decision not to prosecute Red Bull heir Vorayuth Yoovidhya on a charge of reckless driving causing death, has tendered his resignation.

    A statement from the Office of the Attorney-General (OAG), released today, said that he had submitted his resignation letter to the Attorney-General, Mr. Wongsakul Kittipromwong, to indicate his honesty in the handling of Vorayuth’s case.

    The resignation will become effective once it is approved by the Attorney-General.
    According to the statement, Nate Narksook insists that he performed his duty as assigned and had endorsed the prosecutors’ decision on behalf of Mr. Songsakul who, at the time, was on working other business.

    The Deputy Attorney-General was due to retire at the age of 65, on September 30th but, according to the Public Prosecutors Act, a retiring prosecutor can seek an extension of service until the age of 70, from the Prosecutors’ Commission, their regulatory body, to become a senior prosecutor.

     

    11 August 2020
    General
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252731
  • Thailand’s PM to open a forum for students to air their political views
    The Government is ready to hold a forum, tentatively in mid-August, to allow student activists to voice their political views and grievances, said Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha today (Tuesday). He...

    The Government is ready to hold a forum, tentatively in mid-August, to allow student activists to voice their political views and grievances, said Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha today (Tuesday).

    He added that similar fora will be held in various places and the views expressed by the students will be collated and forwarded to him for consideration.

    Earlier this morning, the Prime Minister said he felt uncomfortable with the protest at Thammasat University’s Rangsit campus last night, during which some speakers made “improper references” to “sensitive issues”.

    While recognizing the students’ right to free expression, as far as the Government is concerned, the Prime Minister said that the law must be enforced and violation of the law must be dealt with, otherwise it is useless.

    Meanwhile, Thammasat University today offered an apology for any allegedly improper references to the Monarchy during the protest, as it promised to investigate the matter and to take action against those who are found to have breached the University’s regulations.

    In a statement, issued today, the University promised to vet the use of its campus for extra-curricular activities more carefully, to prevent a repeat of last night’s incident.

    Thammasat University upholds the democratic system with the King as head of the state while supporting free expression by students within the framework of the Constitution, laws and the good morals of the society, read the statement.

    Meanwhile, police have been collecting evidence about last night’s protest, especially the role of the two non-student protesters, human rights lawyer Anont Nampa and Panupong Jaadnok, who are reported to have attended the protests at Thammasat University and in Chiang Mai province.

    Anont and Panupong were released on bail last week, after they were charged with seven offences, including inciting public unrest, in connection with staging illegal protests.

     

    11 August 2020
    Highlight
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252729
  • Thailand’s schools to resume normal classes this Thursday
    Starting this Thursday, all schools in Thailand, under the supervision of the Office of Basic Education Commission (OBEC), will resume in-person teaching, but on a trial basis. All directors of...

    Starting this Thursday, all schools in Thailand, under the supervision of the Office of Basic Education Commission (OBEC), will resume in-person teaching, but on a trial basis.

    All directors of educational district offices were notified today, by Mr. Sanit Yamkaesorn, deputy secretary-general of OBEC, to inform schools in their areas of responsibility of the decision.

    The resumption is in line with the improvement in the COVID-19 situation in the country, which has not recorded a single case of local infection for 78 days in a row.

    Students must, however, keep a record of where they go after school, so that officials can monitor their after-school activities, in case any of them is exposed to COVID-19 and so that the proper steps can be taken to prevent the disease from spreading.

    Although schools can resume classes, they have been instructed to use classrooms for teaching as little as possible, to avoid congestion, and to emphasize out-door activities and out-door teaching.

    In case a school wants to hold a meeting, or activities where many students are expected to attend, the school administrator must notify the area health office and seek permission or report the activity to the respective governor.

     

    11 August 2020
    General
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252726
  • No new COVID-19 infections in Thailand for the second consecutive day
    There were no new COVID-19 infections reported in Thailand for the second day today, as three new recoveries were recorded. The CCSA also reported that there has now not been...

    There were no new COVID-19 infections reported in Thailand for the second day today, as three new recoveries were recorded.

    The CCSA also reported that there has now not been a single case of locally acquired infection in Thailand for 78 consecutive days.

    Cumulative infections in the country remain at 3,351, with 3,163 recoveries. Total fatalities are still 58 and 130 others are still in hospital.

    Globally, cumulative infections increased to 20,249,135 today, with 13,113,179 recoveries. The global COVID-19 death toll is now 738,715.

    The United States still has the highest number of infections, at 5,251,446, followed by Brazil’s 3,057,470 cases, India’s 2,267,153 and Russia’s 892,654.

    Thailand now ranks 112th in the world for infections.

     

    11 August 2020
    Coronavirus Outbreak Update
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=252724